Project of the Month

Partners in Tree Care

Portfolio

Restoration Ecology

Orenco Woods Golf Course

Orenco Woods Golf Course Wetland Mitigation

Treecology was retained by the Hillsboro School District to save a wetland mitigation site that was suffering from improper maintenance and neglect. Before we could replant the riparian buffer and wetlands with some 800+ trees and shrubs to bring it into compliance with the state and federal permits, we had to deal with fields of reed canary grass, thickets of Himalayan blackberry and nutria. The grass and blackberries were controlled by using brush cutters to remove the top growth followed by an end of growing season herbicide treatment. This minimized the amount of herbicide applied in a very sensitive area along Rock Creek, while achieving an effective control. To keep the nutria and beavers at bay, 3 foot tall by 3 foot square exclosures were placed around each of the new plants. Weed control barrier was placed on the scalped ground to reduce the weeding requirement immediately around the plantings.

Tualatin Gardens Wetland Mitigation

Tualatin Gardens Wetland Mitigation

Arne Nyberg can trace his family’s connection to the “Tualatin Gardens” area at the junction of I-5 and Nyberg Road back to when one of his ancestors stood in front of the majestic Chestnut tree on the southbound off-ramp median to block it from the bulldozers that every other tree in the Interstate 5 corridor faced during its construction through Oregon. He asked Treecology to implement a wetland mitigation project that would set an example of how it should be done. Don’t mind the nutria and reed canary grass that infested the site, just deal with it. After creation of 3 seasonal pond areas was finished, We commenced planting the 1 acre site with well over 1000 trees and shrubs, and several thousand plugs of emergent species. The planting areas for the emergents were protected with chicken wire across the pond bottom and exclosures around each of the trees and shrubs. Weed control barriers were placed on scalped ground within the exclosures to limit weeding.

Tualatin Hills Nature Park Oak Restoration

Tualatin Hills Nature Park Oak Restoration

White Oak (or Garry oak) woodland habitats throughout the Willamette Valley and the Pacific Northwest are being lost at an increasing rate due to development and fire suppression which allows the saplings of competing species to establish and overtop the oaks, shading them out. Tualatin Hills Park and Recreation District (THPRD) contracted with Treecology to remove these competing species in areas of their Nature Park where the oaks have the best chance of success. This will be an ongoing process expanding to other areas of the park in future years.